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kidromeo
Administrator
Posts: 124

Our community member Hrishikesh found a two-tailed 1 Rupee coin while in Bombay. In numismatist's lingo these two-tailed or two-headed coins are called 'Magician's Coin'. An example of these type of coin can be found in the Bollywood movie 'Sholay'. Following is the picture of the magician's coin:


Now these coins are not genuine mint error but post-mint mutilated coins. To understand how these coins are manufactured and detected, I put in some excerpts from Ken Potter's article in PCGS site:

"The place to look is not on the edge, but on the inside of the design rim on either side of the coin. This is because one side is comprised of a lathed out or hollowed out coin shell and the other side is made from a coin lathed around its circumference and reduced in thickness to fit snugly inside the shell. The resulting coin is virtually undetectable to the average observer, most of whom ignore the peculiar thud (rather than the familiar ring) the coin emits when dropped on a hard surface. "


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"Coin collecting is the only hobby in the world that you can spend all the money in the world and still have some left over"

October 15, 2011 at 9:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Hrishikesh
Limited Member
Posts: 3

kidromeo at October 15, 2011 at 9:30 AM

Our community member Hrishikesh found a two-tailed 1 Rupee coin while in Bombay. In numismatist's lingo these two-tailed or two-headed coins are called 'Magician's Coin'. An example of these type of coin can be found in the Bollywood movie 'Sholay'. Following is the picture of the magician's coin:


Now these coins are not genuine mint error but post-mint mutilated coins. To understand how these coins are manufactured and detected, I put in some excerpts from Ken Potter's article in PCGS site:

"The place to look is not on the edge, but on the inside of the design rim on either side of the coin. This is because one side is comprised of a lathed out or hollowed out coin shell and the other side is made from a coin lathed around its circumference and reduced in thickness to fit snugly inside the shell. The resulting coin is virtually undetectable to the average observer, most of whom ignore the peculiar thud (rather than the familiar ring) the coin emits when dropped on a hard surface. "


I am not fully convinced if this coin is a magician's coin . I do not think this is one coin hollowed and another inserted into it, as the INSIDE of the edge looks pretty sound on either side. I think this is someone at the mint playing around with dies or testing dies and the 'coin' accidentally slipping into circulation. I got this coin in a BEST bus in the mid 80s as change as no one wanted it and he palmed it off to me as i was a school going kid!!!

Bottomline I am not sure what this diagnosis of this coin is, but of course  a "magicians coin" is a good differential diagnosis !!!

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Hrishikesh :)

October 15, 2011 at 11:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

ignoramus
Limited Member
Posts: 24

well, if that bus conductor had known that this coin is worth more than one rupee, he would not have cheated a small boy. this certainly shows the importance of numismatics!

October 15, 2011 at 1:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

PR
Limited Member
Posts: 55

why one side showing year 1981 and other side showing 1979? if mint error then atleast the years should be same...isn't it?

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October 15, 2011 at 1:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

PR
Limited Member
Posts: 55

..and are those biting marks ???? ....just kidding!!!!

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October 15, 2011 at 1:42 PM Flag Quote & Reply

kidromeo
Administrator
Posts: 124

@Hrishi Well I'm not conviced either that the coin you found is manufactured in the same standard process as Ken Potter described coz it too crudely made but the definition of magician's coin still stands for every double-headed or double-tailed coins ;)

Also as the article mentions, 'For the record, the Mint grinds "flats" of different sizes into the head of the shanks of dies that prevents the obverse and reverse dies to be set interchangeably - thus two obverses or reverses can not be paired together as a unit to strike coins.'. So we should not take in to account any scenario of poor mint workers doing funny stuff when no one is watching :D


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"Coin collecting is the only hobby in the world that you can spend all the money in the world and still have some left over"

October 15, 2011 at 3:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

kidromeo
Administrator
Posts: 124

ignoramus at October 15, 2011 at 1:36 PM

well, if that bus conductor had known that this coin is worth more than one rupee, he would not have cheated a small boy. this certainly shows the importance of numismatics!

I knew a collector from states who used to keep a half dime coin in his wallet as a conversation piece. He tried to pay with it but when the cashiers used to refuse to accept it he would give them a smile and tell them its worth a few hundred dollars. It's a great way to get people take interest in the hobby :)

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"Coin collecting is the only hobby in the world that you can spend all the money in the world and still have some left over"

October 15, 2011 at 3:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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